The Parlor Mob
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Band Members
Sam Bey
Mark Melicia
Paul Ritchie
Dave Rosen
Nick Villapiano

The Parlor Mob make raw rock and roll with a modern edge. It is quite fitting that the band derived its moniker from a notorious 19th century gang of the same name. Around the mid 1800s, the historical New York hoodlums were commissioned by other street gangs to incite riots. Today, these five musical renegades spark a similar explosion, but with verbose riffs, thought provoking vocals and a smooth yet raucous groove.

On their Roadrunner Records debut And You Were A Crow due out May 6, 2008, the New Jersey quintet conjures a vibrant mystique and smoky blues sensibility. The focus track "Can't Keep No Good Boy Down" channels that enigmatic power. The song blends pensive piano playing with a powerful acoustic melody, and its infectious but veiled lyrics hypnotize. During “Hard Times,” jagged, crunchy guitar riffs give way to a chorus that hooks and soars. Guitarists Dave Rosen and Paul Ritchie volley smooth licks and snaky leads through airtight rhythms courtesy of bassist Nick Villapiano and drummer Sam Bey. At the center of it all, vocalist Mark Melicia belts out emotionally charged lines. On “Angry Young Girl” and “Everything You’re Breathing For,” his powerful pipes resonate. By uniquely honing the quintessential New York rock and roll sound with a vibe that keeps things fresh, the band stands primed to blow the doors off the whole genre.

Sam and Paul formed The Parlor Mob in 2004, just before graduating high school. With stints around the East Coast and some self-released tunes, they garnered local notoriety through really standing out in the scene. The band always took pride in their Jersey roots. Nick comments, “I think a lot of our character is a product of being from around here, but we are still on our own.” In 2006, The Parlor Mob’s identity truly became solidified as they began creating a mystique, through penning lively tales in their music. Their contagious songs showed no regard for strict genre conventions. The music coupled with powerful live show led to Roadrunner signing the band in the summer of 2007.

Mark describes the sound best. “It’s straight forward rock and roll with a contemporary style. We're telling stories both musically and lyrically. We’ve got each voice in place, working towards cohesion with this record. It blew my mind the way we were able to do that." Mark draws listeners in with visual vocals that beg for multiple listens. One standout track, “When I Was An Orphan,” evokes vivid imagery with a crow at the center. Mark shows, "The crow is a re-occurring metaphor. It represents things in your life. That particular line sums up the whole record, while keeping everything open for interpretation." Nick adds, "We're of this generation. The album chronicles our lives up to this point, and there's a lot of endearment that comes out of that." Mark’s vocals traverse the entire spectrum of sound—with somber acoustic melodies and fiery hell raising hooks. The album seamlessly segues from hard-hitting cuts like “Carnival of Crows” to contemplative fare like “Can’t Keep No Good Boy Down.”

The Parlor Mob recorded And You Were a Crow with producer Jacquire King (Tom Waits, Kings of Leon, Modest Mouse) in the fall of 2007. Relocating to Asheville, North Carolina, They brought the songs to life in the Echo Mountain Recording studio. Jacquire stayed with the band and he was quickly welcomed into The Parlor Mob family. "He just became the sixth member of the band," comments Mark. "He had an almost paternal role. He was there for us. He got the best out of us, and he took it so seriously. It was pretty amazing." Dave goes on, "He was emotionally invested in the record. The songs are really important and close to us. Jacquire felt the same way."

While writing, the band pays close attention to detail. Each element functions as a piece of a larger theme. Dave says, "There are all sorts of things going on in the record that will jump out from time to time on a good sound system. We really wanted to write a complete album that's interesting to listen to every time. We aimed to break down boundaries, and there are a lot of different soundscapes on the record. We want to make people excited about rock music again." The epic “Tide of Tears” is bound to excite any true music fan, with nearly nine minutes of dynamic sonic ecstasy.

Onstage is where The Parlor Mob shine, and the guys pour their hearts into each and every gig. "We all love to put on a show and entertain,” says Dave. “At no point are we going through the motions. We don't concentrate on making things sound like the record. It's free form for us. We consider ourselves a live band. People are going to get all of our energy." The band has much touring ahead, and will be bringing that energy around the globe.

In the end, The Parlor Mob are a rock and roll band. They eschew convention and boundaries in favor of pushing the envelope. They can play acoustic or come out swinging. Nick says, "One of the things that people forget about rock and roll is that you can do whatever you want, and you don’t have to care what anyone thinks." It’s a fitting assessment and reflection of their attitude. Mark concludes, “We want to make the most creative music that we can. The songs reflect what’s going on around us while we’re writing. Art should always mirror the times. We're not trying to get on a soapbox. We aim to be a reflection of the human experience today. That's all we can really do.”

There’s no doubt. This mob rules.

Live Shots Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane Hard Rock Cafe, London, 10th March 2009 by Nigel Crane